[ad_1]

For those of us who are used to public speaking delivery of hopefully a great eulogy should not be a problem. If, however, you are like me the idea of standing before a large gathering of people and delivering a eulogy can be a frightening prospect. In addition, one is often already emotionally stressed due to the death of a loved one.

I have good news. No matter who you are if you are well prepared and speak from the heart I can guarantee that your eulogy will be just fine. No one at the service where you are to deliver your eulogy is there to judge your presentation; they are present to mourn a death and celebrate a life.

To assist my presentation I made extensive notes, and consciously controlled my breathing, spoke slowly and regularly raised my head to pause between points and thus stay in control. I have heard some particularly effective eulogies delivered by two people, eg mother and daughter discussing a deceased husband / father. This type of eulogy can provide interesting interaction and mutual support

As to the structure of the eulogy, I wrote my eulogy in a rough chronological order. Start perhaps with birth, adolescences etc. markers in the person’s life and include the obvious like family, career and sporting achievements and hobbies. In this instance I felt it appropriate to add some humorous anecdotes which were totally appropriate. In the context of a eulogy I found humour very poignant. My eulogy was rounded off with a summary of how I perceived the deceased in life and their legacy

In summary a eulogy doesn’t have to be long it only has to be heartfelt. My eulogy. gave me the opportunity actively participate in an important event and to publicly express my feelings and the value of my relationship with the deceased.

When you have delivered the eulogy I am sure you will feel as uplifted as I did.

[ad_2]
funeral quotes